Teens

The content of this website applies to everyone, regardless of age. Below, however, are questions recently asked by teens:

  • I live in a household where domestic abuse happens between the adults. What should I do?
  • Tell a trusted adult – a relative, school counsellor, local social worker – and ask them to help .  You can also call one of the numbers on the Resources page such as Childline to ask for help.  Try not to get involved in the conflict.
  • I am being abused by one of the adults in my home.  What should I do?
  • If you feel that your life is in danger, get to a place of safety – a trusted friend or relative.   Take this person with you to lay a charge with the police.  If the police refuse to help you show them this page. Insist that you report the abuse and start proceedings for a protection order or to be removed to a place of safety.
  • If your life is not in immediate danger, tell a trusted adult – a relative, school counsellor, local social worker – and ask them for their help.  You can also call one of the numbers on the Resources page such as Childline to ask for help.  
  • I know someone who is being abused.  What should I do?
  • Listen to them, believe what they say (don’t judge them) and ask how you can help.  You can help them to identify if it is abuse and support them emotionally. Encourage them to seek help from this website and offer to accompany them to the police station to report it and apply for a protection order.  
  • Do I need to be 18 years old to report domestic abuse to the police or state authorities?
  • No.  You have the same rights as an adult, so you do not need parent /guardian consent to get a protection order.  We do however advise that you take someone with you for emotional support.  
  • What is consent?
  • Consent is when a person agrees to do something by choice AND has the capacity and freedom to make an informed decision.  
  • Consent needs to be given expressly – You have to say it out loud, silence is not consent
  • Consent needs to be given specifically, for example for kissing or taking off your clothes 
  • Consent can be withdrawn at any time. If you feel uncomfortable at any time, you can withdraw consent and demand that the activity stops – even if you are both naked
  • If you are married or in a relationship, you can refuse to consent to sex. If your partner continues to have sex with you, it is rape in terms of the law
  • According to the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, consent cannot be given if the person is
    • asleep, unconscious or in an altered state of consciousness (under the influence of alcohol or drugged) to the extent that their judgment is impaired 
    • mentally disabled
    • below the age of 12
    • persuaded to give consent under false pretences (being tricked or lied to)
    • threatened (or someone they know is threatened)
    • the victim of an abuse of power or authority (by for example a teacher or police officer)